Harry Potter

2456789

Comments

  • Any Kittens on here with kids reading the series? My oldest grandson, age nine, just started the first volume. I haven't had a chance to talk to him about it. I have never read any of the books, but have seen some of the movies. Once, a while back, I ran across a website, very thoughtfully written, that suggested that kids should really wait til they are around twelve or so to read the series, as elements of the storyline will not compute with the younger readers, and that some of the darkness will be too troubling and kids just won't have the life experience to put everything in proper context. Of course I have no idea that web address now.

    Anyone have thoughts on this?
  • @Qitkat I don't have kids but the books really age as Harry does - so when the series starts he's 11 and it's very 11-ish. By the time he's 17 he's very 17! The writing is more mature and so are the issues. I do know 7 year olds who've claimed to read them and understand them, but I think really after the first 3 your grandson should probably have a break until he's a little older.
  • This thread has been fun to read, Kittens!

    I had a unique and lovely experience with Harry Potter books:  I read every word of all of them aloud to my husband.

    (He likes to listen to recorded books on the drive home from work.  And I love to read aloud, so I often read books or long articles to him in the evenings while he does mindless paperwork, goes through mail, etc..)

    Of course we had no idea it would end up being seven big books – I just started reading the first one and we were charmed by it.  This was before HP caught on in the US, but the first two books were out.  We were still in the middle of Book 1 when I bought the second.  I even created an elaborate treasure hunt for him to find it:  it began with a mysterious letter in the mail (sent by me) that included a difficult clue…and the hidden prize was a life-sized white owl I’d made from cardboard and cotton balls, gripping a wrapped parcel (Book Two) in its pipe-cleaner talons. :)  Good times.

    I loved reading Viktor Krum – remember how he could never get Hermione’s name right?  Herminnony…  And I had fun doing a 1940s-movie “tough-talking newspaper woman” voice for Rita Skeeter: quick, smart, sly, manipulative.  Luna was fun to do – I made her very spacey, of course, but she was also guileless, perceptive, and kind.  My absolute favorite character to voice was malevolent Delores Umbridge:  kittens and hair bows and so much pink, barely concealing that black heart!  You know how actors always say they most enjoy playing a villain?  She was delicious to read aloud, with all her phony sweetness.

    Some of you must’ve read the books aloud to kids, yes?
     
    I have a 'Funny But Maybe Ya Hadda Be There’ memory:

    As you can imagine, it required a good deal of effort to come up with different accents, vocal quirks, etc. for each of Rowlings' 5 gazillion characters…and I didn’t always succeed, lol.  In one shadowy, intense scene, a gaggle of Death Eater women (some unidentified) are hissing and plotting together, and I was having trouble varying my voice to differentiate them.  But I thought I was doing OK – until I read one of the lines and Mr WW gasped really loudly and said, “MRS. WEASLEY is there???!!!!”

    LOL.  His eyes were huge and round with surprise, and it came out about an octave higher than his regular pitch – he was just so totally caught up in the story, like a kid.... You might just have to trust me on this, but it was a hilarious moment of creative failure on my part. :)


  • Oh, @winterwhite, I feel like I WAS there, that was such a wonderful story. I also love reading aloud, and sometimes read thigns to Mr H whether he wants me to or not! What a great way to experience Harry Potter.

    @QitKat, I agree with what was said above about HP aging through the series... Your grandson is probably fine, but i think pacing is key... one or two a year.


  • Thanks so much everyone. Great advice. I'll have a chat with his parents about this topic.

    @WinterWhite  What a lucky fellow your man is, and how creative are you!! It almost made me think that someone like you who cared so much would have been a wonderful way for other folks to experience the books audibly. Regrettably I doubt this would be a thing of interest in my household, and I don't see my grandson often enough to keep the pace up on the book(s). Although the truth is I also love to read aloud and use different voices. I do it all the time when I do read to my g'kids.
  • edited December 2015
    @Qitkat, my son started listening to the audio books when he was 7 or 8 or 9. At his request, I read the book ahead of where he was listening so that I could give him a heads-up about anything I thought might be upsetting to him and he could decide if he wanted us to skip that part when we came to it in the audio book (and there were definitely parts he didn't want to listen to -- Jim Dale's narration, especially of Voldy, could be quite creepy at times!). That's really the recommendation I would make, to pre-read, especially after the first 3 books. We did eventually work our way through all the audio books, but I continued to read ahead of where he was, especially in the latter books because they were so dark and sad at times. For those last couple books, before he listened to the audio books he specifically wanted to know who had died and sometimes wanted to know the details so he could be emotionally prepared -- and yet even knowing beforehand, certain deaths were still particularly hard for him (Hedwig & Dobby) and there were scenes he preferred to skip listening to altogether. The last book came out when he was 9 and I devoured it over that weekend (I was pretty hardcore into HP by that point!), but I'm pretty sure we didn't listen to the audiobooks of those latter books when he was that young. I can ask him if he remembers how old he was when he started and finished the series (he's 17 now, and I know it's been at least 4 years since he finished the series). He did eventually read all the books himself, even though he'd listened to the audio books beforehand. He will flat-out tell you he didn't like the darker themes of the latter books and has no interest in re-reading them or re-watching the movies for them. I could say that's because he was younger when he read/watched them, but I don't have an interest in re-reading or re-watching those latter books either and I have more than a few decades on him ;-).

    It may be hard for your grandson to want to only read 1 or 2 books a year or take a break after book 3. Even though my son took his time listening to the audio books and read other books in-between, HP was interesting enough to him that he didn't want to take too long of a break between books because he didn't want to forget details. The details are especially important with the books (vs the movies) because tidbits get dropped in earlier books that come into play in later books. In fact, that was one of my favorite things Rowling did, was to mention something early in the series and several books later it came into play! She did that very well.
  • @glenda your son sounds very sensible!

    @winterwhite I love that story! I love reading aloud but I don't do different voices.
  • glenda said:
    @Qitkat, my son started listening to the audio books when he was 7 or 8 or 9. At his request, I read the book ahead of where he was listening so that I could give him a heads-up about anything I thought might be upsetting to him and he could decide if he wanted us to skip that part when we came to it in the audio book (and there were definitely parts he didn't want to listen to -- Jim Dale's narration, especially of Voldy, could be quite creepy at times!). That's really the recommendation I would make, to pre-read, especially after the first 3 books. We did eventually work our way through all the audio books, but I continued to read ahead of where he was, especially in the latter books because they were so dark and sad at times. For those last couple books, before he listened to the audio books he specifically wanted to know who had died and sometimes wanted to know the details so he could be emotionally prepared -- and yet even knowing beforehand, certain deaths were still particularly hard for him (Hedwig & Dobby) and there were scenes he preferred to skip listening to altogether. The last book came out when he was 9 and I devoured it over that weekend (I was pretty hardcore into HP by that point!), but I'm pretty sure we didn't listen to the audiobooks of those latter books when he was that young. I can ask him if he remembers how old he was when he started and finished the series (he's 17 now, and I know it's been at least 4 years since he finished the series). He did eventually read all the books himself, even though he'd listened to the audio books beforehand. He will flat-out tell you he didn't like the darker themes of the latter books and has no interest in re-reading them or re-watching the movies for them. I could say that's because he was younger when he read/watched them, but I don't have an interest in re-reading or re-watching those latter books either and I have more than a few decades on him ;-).

    It may be hard for your grandson to want to only read 1 or 2 books a year or take a break after book 3. Even though my son took his time listening to the audio books and read other books in-between, HP was interesting enough to him that he didn't want to take too long of a break between books because he didn't want to forget details. The details are especially important with the books (vs the movies) because tidbits get dropped in earlier books that come into play in later books. In fact, that was one of my favorite things Rowling did, was to mention something early in the series and several books later it came into play! She did that very well.
    @Glenda It's what I think folks are missing that we who were younger when the books first came out, and read them contemporaneously, were able to do ... anticipate...! It was soooo hard to wait but it made each new book so much more exciting!

    I loved going back and re-reading the most recent book the fall before a new one would come out. It refreshed all those details, reminded me of "inside jokes" and built my excitement for the newest one... If i can, my plan if I have kids will be a HP book for Christmas each year... re-read the previous one right before...
  • @WinterWhite, what a charming story. I will never think of the Death Eaters the same way again. :-)

    I tried reading the first one aloud to my son; both my kids HATED reading when they were young, but liked hearing stories. But HP just overwhelmed him because the book looked so big. He liked the movies, though. (He still hasn't read the books; I doubt he ever will.) The eldest read them later and has reread them numerous times.

    Our neighbor, two years older, did read the books at an early age, but after the first one, she lost enthusiasm. (She's super-bright and super-mature.) And amusingly, when my spouse took her and my eldest to see the movie, where the car was caught in the tree at the beginning (not sure of the number), she was so horrified she left the theater. I think they got a credit to see a cartoon instead, in another room. A bizarre thing to be the image that terrified her. 
  • This thread has been fun to read, Kittens!

    I had a unique and lovely experience with Harry Potter books:  I read every word of all of them aloud to my husband.

    (He likes to listen to recorded books on the drive home from work.  And I love to read aloud, so I often read books or long articles to him in the evenings while he does mindless paperwork, goes through mail, etc..)

    Of course we had no idea it would end up being seven big books – I just started reading the first one and we were charmed by it.  This was before HP caught on in the US, but the first two books were out.  We were still in the middle of Book 1 when I bought the second.  I even created an elaborate treasure hunt for him to find it:  it began with a mysterious letter in the mail (sent by me) that included a difficult clue…and the hidden prize was a life-sized white owl I’d made from cardboard and cotton balls, gripping a wrapped parcel (Book Two) in its pipe-cleaner talons. :)  Good times.

    I loved reading Viktor Krum – remember how he could never get Hermione’s name right?  Herminnony…  And I had fun doing a 1940s-movie “tough-talking newspaper woman” voice for Rita Skeeter: quick, smart, sly, manipulative.  Luna was fun to do – I made her very spacey, of course, but she was also guileless, perceptive, and kind.  My absolute favorite character to voice was malevolent Delores Umbridge:  kittens and hair bows and so much pink, barely concealing that black heart!  You know how actors always say they most enjoy playing a villain?  She was delicious to read aloud, with all her phony sweetness.

    Some of you must’ve read the books aloud to kids, yes?
     
    I have a 'Funny But Maybe Ya Hadda Be There’ memory:

    As you can imagine, it required a good deal of effort to come up with different accents, vocal quirks, etc. for each of Rowlings' 5 gazillion characters…and I didn’t always succeed, lol.  In one shadowy, intense scene, a gaggle of Death Eater women (some unidentified) are hissing and plotting together, and I was having trouble varying my voice to differentiate them.  But I thought I was doing OK – until I read one of the lines and Mr WW gasped really loudly and said, “MRS. WEASLEY is there???!!!!”

    LOL.  His eyes were huge and round with surprise, and it came out about an octave higher than his regular pitch – he was just so totally caught up in the story, like a kid.... You might just have to trust me on this, but it was a hilarious moment of creative failure on my part. :)


    This is such a great story, I envision a little semi-circle of fluffy white cats in the background with their ears pricked forward, especially when Professor McGonagall transfigures. 
  • I read the books to my son, starting at age 10.  I was reading them myself first, as I had more time to read on the train and when he was playing with his friends or at sports practices.  So I would be about 2 books ahead of what I was reading to him most of the time. Still, I was the one who would get all choked up or would need to take a break when reading about deaths to him even though I knew they were coming. Somehow, we were both reading the last book at the same time, I'm not sure how that happened but I must have not had much time to read alone for awhile.  I was terrified that Hagrid was going to die in the motorcycle crash after they left Privet Drive and was completely freaking out.  He was all, Mom calm down. 

  • I miss the excitement of the book premieres, even though I was in my 30s when the books first came out.  As a life long book nerd, it was so much fun to see people lined up for a book instead of a movie or a video game!   And whenever a new book came out, I'd have to go back and reread all the previous ones, so I could catch the little hints that were expanded on later. 

  • I remember when Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince came out and it was sold out mostly everywhere.  I had a random stop at Rite Aid and there sat the last one on the counter by the cashier.  That's probably the only time I've ever bought a book at a drug store. 


  • This thread has been fun to read, Kittens!

    I had a unique and lovely experience with Harry Potter books:  I read every word of all of them aloud to my husband.

    (He likes to listen to recorded books on the drive home from work.  And I love to read aloud, so I often read books or long articles to him in the evenings while he does mindless paperwork, goes through mail, etc..)

    Of course we had no idea it would end up being seven big books – I just started reading the first one and we were charmed by it.  This was before HP caught on in the US, but the first two books were out.  We were still in the middle of Book 1 when I bought the second.  I even created an elaborate treasure hunt for him to find it:  it began with a mysterious letter in the mail (sent by me) that included a difficult clue…and the hidden prize was a life-sized white owl I’d made from cardboard and cotton balls, gripping a wrapped parcel (Book Two) in its pipe-cleaner talons. :)  Good times.

    I loved reading Viktor Krum – remember how he could never get Hermione’s name right?  Herminnony…  And I had fun doing a 1940s-movie “tough-talking newspaper woman” voice for Rita Skeeter: quick, smart, sly, manipulative.  Luna was fun to do – I made her very spacey, of course, but she was also guileless, perceptive, and kind.  My absolute favorite character to voice was malevolent Delores Umbridge:  kittens and hair bows and so much pink, barely concealing that black heart!  You know how actors always say they most enjoy playing a villain?  She was delicious to read aloud, with all her phony sweetness.

    Some of you must’ve read the books aloud to kids, yes?
     
    I have a 'Funny But Maybe Ya Hadda Be There’ memory:

    As you can imagine, it required a good deal of effort to come up with different accents, vocal quirks, etc. for each of Rowlings' 5 gazillion characters…and I didn’t always succeed, lol.  In one shadowy, intense scene, a gaggle of Death Eater women (some unidentified) are hissing and plotting together, and I was having trouble varying my voice to differentiate them.  But I thought I was doing OK – until I read one of the lines and Mr WW gasped really loudly and said, “MRS. WEASLEY is there???!!!!”

    LOL.  His eyes were huge and round with surprise, and it came out about an octave higher than his regular pitch – he was just so totally caught up in the story, like a kid.... You might just have to trust me on this, but it was a hilarious moment of creative failure on my part. :)


    This is such a great story, I envision a little semi-circle of fluffy white cats in the background with their ears pricked forward, especially when Professor McGonagall transfigures. 
    Yes -- I was envisioning it with the cats, too!  It is a great story @WinterWhite

    It is one of the great disappointments of parenthood that my kids would never let me read chapter books to them. I had always enjoyed it when my mom read to us when I was a kid and she was still doing it well into my teens (she has the uncanny ability to read in a car without getting car sick, so she would read aloud to us on road trips. This was before books on tape. Or car tape decks, for that matter).

    (Even further off topic: During my first pregnancy we had read that babies can hear and recognize your voice in utero, but my husband is not a talker at all. So he would read Rumpole of the Bailey stories to me (all very funny). Only time that he has ever read to me. It was very sweet).
  • KarenFK said:
    This thread has been fun to read, Kittens!

    I had a unique and lovely experience with Harry Potter books:  I read every word of all of them aloud to my husband.

    (He likes to listen to recorded books on the drive home from work.  And I love to read aloud, so I often read books or long articles to him in the evenings while he does mindless paperwork, goes through mail, etc..)

    Of course we had no idea it would end up being seven big books – I just started reading the first one and we were charmed by it.  This was before HP caught on in the US, but the first two books were out.  We were still in the middle of Book 1 when I bought the second.  I even created an elaborate treasure hunt for him to find it:  it began with a mysterious letter in the mail (sent by me) that included a difficult clue…and the hidden prize was a life-sized white owl I’d made from cardboard and cotton balls, gripping a wrapped parcel (Book Two) in its pipe-cleaner talons. :)  Good times.

    I loved reading Viktor Krum – remember how he could never get Hermione’s name right?  Herminnony…  And I had fun doing a 1940s-movie “tough-talking newspaper woman” voice for Rita Skeeter: quick, smart, sly, manipulative.  Luna was fun to do – I made her very spacey, of course, but she was also guileless, perceptive, and kind.  My absolute favorite character to voice was malevolent Delores Umbridge:  kittens and hair bows and so much pink, barely concealing that black heart!  You know how actors always say they most enjoy playing a villain?  She was delicious to read aloud, with all her phony sweetness.

    Some of you must’ve read the books aloud to kids, yes?
     
    I have a 'Funny But Maybe Ya Hadda Be There’ memory:

    As you can imagine, it required a good deal of effort to come up with different accents, vocal quirks, etc. for each of Rowlings' 5 gazillion characters…and I didn’t always succeed, lol.  In one shadowy, intense scene, a gaggle of Death Eater women (some unidentified) are hissing and plotting together, and I was having trouble varying my voice to differentiate them.  But I thought I was doing OK – until I read one of the lines and Mr WW gasped really loudly and said, “MRS. WEASLEY is there???!!!!”

    LOL.  His eyes were huge and round with surprise, and it came out about an octave higher than his regular pitch – he was just so totally caught up in the story, like a kid.... You might just have to trust me on this, but it was a hilarious moment of creative failure on my part. :)


    This is such a great story, I envision a little semi-circle of fluffy white cats in the background with their ears pricked forward, especially when Professor McGonagall transfigures. 
    Yes -- I was envisioning it with the cats, too!  It is a great story @WinterWhite

    It is one of the great disappointments of parenthood that my kids would never let me read chapter books to them. I had always enjoyed it when my mom read to us when I was a kid and she was still doing it well into my teens (she has the uncanny ability to read in a car without getting car sick, so she would read aloud to us on road trips. This was before books on tape. Or car tape decks, for that matter).

    (Even further off topic: During my first pregnancy we had read that babies can hear and recognize your voice in utero, but my husband is not a talker at all. So he would read Rumpole of the Bailey stories to me (all very funny). Only time that he has ever read to me. It was very sweet).
    I didn't learn to read until I was 7 because I had two aunts who were more than happy to read to me, and they could read much better books than the ones I was supposed to be learning how to read.
  • you guys, this thread is like my new happy place.

    Harry Potter, cats, babies, mommies, daddies, road trips and reading (my favoritest thing!) all in one place.
  • Ahhh this thread just made me bubble over with happiness at my desk!  I love Harry Potter.  LOVE LOVE LOVE.  I picked up the series when the first two books were out, and it was shortly after that they got super duper popular.  It worked out really well, because I was around Harry's age - in fact, I think I was 13 when the 3rd book came out, and 17 when the 7th did.  Perfect age for it, and it's really stuck with me.  I'm re reading the series now (I'm on GoF.  I took a break halfway through the chapter because CEDRIC!  NO!) and I'm having movie marathons with one of BB's friends.

    I have LOTS OF OPINIONS about the series.  One of them being that Ron and Hermione and Harry and Ginny are perfect together.  And they're all family now!  Ahh happy feels!
  • I love Harry and Ginny.  She's not afraid to tell him where he gets off and he's crazy about her because she's herself, and is absolutely the kind of guy who would actually support her in her Quidditch career even though he could've played for England himself if he hadn't been ridding the world of dark wizards.

    I always feel like that's the saddest part of the series.  Harry could have had so much FUN and still been a decent guy (*coughAreYouListeningCormacMcLaggencough*) if it weren't for Voldemort.
  • I already posted this on the happy thread, but it belongs here as well



    I dunno, though, do you think Harry would have been the same person had he not been left in an abusive home (*coughDumbledoreYouDickcough*) for 10 years?
  • This looks wonderful! http://www.teawashere.com/2645/what-every-harry-potter-fan-should-do-this-week/ pity I only heard about it today - I don't think I can get there before Saturday.
  • I love this thread!! My dad is a huge Harry Potter fan and so am I - I don't think the rest of my family is so much, and my younger brother (who shares a birthday with Harry!) flatly refused to read the books. We'll have the last laugh, though, now that he has a daughter! I already have plans to get her to make him read the books to her. 

    I read the last book in one sitting in my apartment, and ended the day with a headache and tear-streaked face, but it was so SATISFYING. 
  • My favorite was The Goblet Of Fire. The Death Eaters making a very public reappearance, The Yule Ball, the dragons, the various tasks in the Tri-Wizard tournament, Voldemort as a slithering slug like creature until he regains his form, Peter Pettigrew being the rat that he is, "Kill the spare.", Harry having to face evil in it's most cavalier and hideous form.
    It's such a thrilling ride mixed with such sinister and horrifying moments.


    My second favorite is The Order Of The Phoenix. I loved all the scenes that take place in the decaying Black mansion and how fragile a state of mind we see Sirius to be in. And the break in to The Ministry Of Magic.
  • Today we learned that my supervisor has never read or watched any Harry Potter and we were pretty aghast since we kind of assumed she would have read them. This sent us down a wormhole of talking about Harry Potter for a solid 20 minutes including pulling up the websites for the Wizarding World and the Fantastic beasts trailer. 

    I don't know if I've ever thought about which book is my favorite. Like @JealousofBelle I fell right in line with Harry's age progression so I really did grow up with the books. I remember reading the 4th book and having to stop reading for a bit because I was getting super freaked out by all the scary stuff in the tri-wizard tournament. I was in NY doing college tours when the 7th book came out and pre-ordered it to my grandma's house. I remember being very annoyed when I had to stop reading it when we got off the subway in order to actually go visit a campus. 

    I think my favorite movie is the Prisoner of Azkaban. I've probably seen it more times than any of the other movies and it came at a great time when the books and movies were both going full speed. I also think it was the movie (and book) that shifted into a darker place but was still in my good spot of not-too-scary. Also Hermione punches Draco! 

    image



  • I don't know why, but when they're visiting Mr. Weasley in the hospital and Harry is overwhelmed by all the things there - the candles in nice sanitary bubbles, the portraits of healers giving advice, and all the crazy maladies they see when they go again on Christmas (the toddler with large feathery wings sprouting from the back of her rompers??? genius!) is one of my absolute favorite scenes ever.  It gives me the same feeling I get when I've gone to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios and I'm inside the story. 

    Has anyone else been to WWHP?  I'm dying to get a full set of robes but they're $110 per set so it's a bit pricey.  I have to say, walking into Honeydukes was almost as good as they describe it in the book (problem is, it's very hot in Florida so you don't get that warm sugar/cold air change), and I was definitely a kid in that candy store!  And the chocolate frogs!  They're huge AND they're nice chocolate, AND the collectible cards are wonderful.  I got Dumbledore - and I bought a second one for my mom and she got Rowena Ravenclaw, which as a Ravenclaw, she's very proud of.

    Also, if you do ever go, make sure you get the two-park pass and take the train between the two.  The windows are actually some kind of video screen, and you see different scenes on the way to/from Hogwarts/Hogsmeade and Diagon Alley.

    I went to WWHP in March of 2011 and it was amazing! I didn't get a chocolate frog but I did get a butterbeer and it was for sure one of the sweetest drinks I've ever tasted. I compare it to melting down those butterscotch candies into liquid form. I didn't expect it to be quite so sweet! When I went it was just Hogsmeade so I would love to go back to experience Diagon Alley!  It was probably one of the only times I happily waited on a ~2 hour line for a ride (for Hogwarts castle). 
  • Leandra said:

    I went to WWHP in March of 2011 and it was amazing! I didn't get a chocolate frog but I did get a butterbeer and it was for sure one of the sweetest drinks I've ever tasted. I compare it to melting down those butterscotch candies into liquid form. I didn't expect it to be quite so sweet! When I went it was just Hogsmeade so I would love to go back to experience Diagon Alley!  It was probably one of the only times I happily waited on a ~2 hour line for a ride (for Hogwarts castle). 
    I was SO lucky - the first day I went my friend who works at Universal took me and it was DEAD.  I mean, there were plenty of people for say, a supermarket, but not a theme park. We got there early and the line for Hogwarts castle took 25 minutes.  TWENTY FIVE.  That's nothing!  We went on all the rides (except that dragon rollercoaster thing because rollercoasters make me sick), and since he's a park employee we got all food and purchases except alcohol and "collector's items" half off.  I went crazy and bought a wand and a scarf and and butterbeers and every beer they brewed in the park and we had lunch there and everything.  There are only two "collector's items" that I really want enough to buy and one is Lucius Malfoy's walking stick (no gem in the snake's mouth though which is BS), and the opal necklace which is an exact replica from the one in the movie, but they're about $300 each so...not gonna happen unless I get rich.


  • edited December 2015
    @GraziDMenti and @KarenFK – there was a cat listening!  Only one, but he came to every reading session and sat a few feet away, facing me, in a contented Buddha-kitty position.  His name was Brennan and he just loved listening to stories being read aloud.  (Not long after, we were delighted by the cat who did the same thing in the movie Amélie, if anyone remembers that…?)


    @Qitkat – thank you, Sweetie!  I’ll be sure to tell Mr WW how lucky he is. ;)  I’d almost forgotten about that whole treasure hunt I made for him.  It seems like something @firebirdsinger and @Shelby would’ve done, doesn’t it?


    After we finished the final book, we cast about for another series to get interested in.  There were lots of articles written at the time with suggestions – you know, “How To Keep Your Children Reading Now That They’ve Finished HP” – and I did try a few things from the library.  But none of them clicked with us.  What did other Kittens find to read after saying goodbye to Harry?
  • @WinterWhite did you try Discworld? I haven't found another YA series that grabbed me in the same way but Pratchett is magic.
  • Thanks, @foodycatAlicia, I'll check it out!   We appreciated HP even more after we gave up on every other series we tried.  The other books might even have been well-written, but they just didn't have characters we immediately and deeply cared about and/or worlds we wanted to linger in.
  • @WinterWhite did you try Discworld? I haven't found another YA series that grabbed me in the same way but Pratchett is magic.
    @foodycatAlicia ; Just went to Wikipedia and learned this:  "Forty one Discworld novels have been published."   Eeep!  :)
  • @WinterWhite, I am somewhat embarrassed to admit that I have never read any of the Discworld books because there are so many and I don't know where to start (there are different series within the overall Discworld series, as I understand it). Maybe @foodycatAlicia can recommend a good starting point.
Sign In or Register to comment.