What deliciousness are you famous for?

24

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  • edited February 2015
    @Trillium0128
    recipe for the mushroom sauce
    Thank you so much. Such a simple idea, but sounds just heavenly. I love shiitakes too, and use them more now than the button ones; I think they seem to keep better too.

    Oh meohmy, that recipe for Game Day Nachos is going in my recipe file. Thanks for sharing it. Sounds so delicious! I'm curious why you skipped the radishes. It never occurred to me to use them in Mexican dishes til I saw Chef Rick Bayliss use them a lot. It is surprising what a nice crunchy with a little bite of heat they can add to a dish.
  • I am deeply jealous of all of you who are good at baked goods. Especially @altalinda, who can make blueberry pie. I'd give a lot to be able to make a nice pie crust.

    (then again, if I were good at making baked goods, I'd probably have to work out a lot harder to negate the damage)
    Pie crust can be tricky, you're right ... and I've found that there are pie people who only swear by their recipe even if it's really hard for anyone else to make.  I always recommend the go-to pie crust from Cook's Illustrated, which is all done in a food processor and uses vodka from the freezer in lieu of ice water because the vodka evaporates and makes a nice flakey crust.

    I've get a lot of pie requests and I used to use the recipe I learned handed down for generations before food processors were a thing, using a pastry blender (for clarity, I mean the tool with the U-shaped wires with the wooden handle at the top of the U) and handling it as little as possible.  The Cook's Illustrated method is painless in comparison, if you want to give it a go.
  • @Qitkat I've never been a fan of radishes, and my Mexican husband is also not a fan of the radish/wasabi brand of heat.  He's all about the habanero/jalapeno type of heat.  What I think received the most attention was the lime-infused sour cream.  That stuff was good.
  • DeDe said:
     I'd give a lot to be able to make a nice pie crust.

    I always recommend the go-to pie crust from Cook's Illustrated, which is all done in a food processor and uses vodka from the freezer in lieu of ice water because the vodka evaporates and makes a nice flakey crust.

    I've get a lot of pie requests and I used to use the recipe I learned handed down for generations before food processors were a thing, using a pastry blender (for clarity, I mean the tool with the U-shaped wires with the wooden handle at the top of the U) and handling it as little as possible.  The Cook's Illustrated method is painless in comparison, if you want to give it a go.
    @DeDe Yes, I swear by the vodka recipe now too from CI. Almost always get compliments with my Bourbon Pecan Pie. The only drawback I've found is that it gets soft rather quickly when rolling out. And I also used to use the old-fashioned pastry blender method, and still do for small tarts as it comes together so quickly.

    I had forgotten that my two most requested dishes to share every Thanksgiving are the pie and Cornbread Oyster Stuffing.
  • @kimmeister
    I totally get it :) 
    For me a little jalapeno heat goes a long way, so I like the two together sometimes. I can imagine that sour cream lime is yummy. 
  • My mom's killer Ricotta Pie (Torta di Ricotta)

    Make your favorite pastry and set out into 9-inch cake pan (shape like a tort) or use a frozen pre-made 9” pie shell

    For filling:

    3 cups ricotta cheese
    1 cup sugar
    1/4 cup flour
    2 Tbs grated orange peel
    2 Tbs grated lemon peal
    1 Tbs vanilla extract
    1/8 tsp salt 

    4 eggs - beat until foamy

    Gradually add 1 cup sugar to eggs, beating until eggs are thick and piled softly.   Stir eggs into ricotta mixture until well-blended and smooth. Pour filling into pastry.

    Bake at 350F about 50 - 60 minutes or until mixture is firm and pastry is golden brown. Remove from oven and place on cooling rack.

    This is best served 24 hrs after making as the ingredients combine and marry very well overnight.

    Don't even think about the calorie and cholesterol count.

    Makes 8-10 servings 

  • edited February 2015
    @stellavision, I always get raves for my crust and I owe it all to the Way to Cook by Julia Child.  She has a recipe (with photos) for making the dough in a food processor that's proven foolproof.  The only tweak I've added is to substitute lard for Crisco (unless I'm making the pie for eaters who don't consume pork).
  • DeDe said:
    Pie crust can be tricky, you're right ... and I've found that there are pie people who only swear by their recipe even if it's really hard for anyone else to make.  I always recommend the go-to pie crust from Cook's Illustrated, which is all done in a food processor and uses vodka from the freezer in lieu of ice water because the vodka evaporates and makes a nice flakey crust.

    Vodka is also the secret ingredient of my grandma's blini batter. Produces tasty, nicely puffy blinis.
  • This Serious Eats post on Korean fried chicken provides a good explanation for why vodka improves blinis and pie crusts - anything where you want to keep the texture short and tender.
  • Indian food.
    I'm a white corn fed Midwestern girl who traveled to India in the 90's and married an Indian fellow. Since he moved here to be with me I figured the least I could do was learn how to cook some Indian food for him.
    He showed me some stuff and I read some cookbooks and that was that. Some things I make for him he says are better than the way his Mom made them. I keep expecting his Mom to throw down a thunderbolt from Heaven at my head when he says that.
    The cuisine of India is so specific to region, religion and even income. Half of my husband's family are South Indian Catholics who cook with coconut oil and a lot of fish, His Mom's side of the family are Maharashtran Muslims who eat very spicy meat dishes. I've learned to cook both ways. Also a bit of Punjabi food which is the cuisine you find in a typical Indian restaurant.
    I guess my specialities would be South Indian Beef Fry, Goan Fish Curry, Spinach and Potato, Beef Palau, Chana Masala and Butter Chicken.
    Something I've never been able to do right in 17 years is Biryani, a rich and yummy meat and rice dish. So many freaking steps! So many opportunities to screw it up! Bah!
  • @Gemfemme could you share the beef fry recipe please? I make a South Indian chicken dry fry that we love, and I am wondering if it is similar? The one we make is a recipe from one of my husband's co-workers.
  • My Caesar dressing from scratch (with coddled eggs) has a large fan base and growing.

    At Christmas time my Date Nut Bars and old time cookie recipes along with Fantasy Fudge are a winner.
  • @Gemfemme could you share the beef fry recipe please? I make a South Indian chicken dry fry that we love, and I am wondering if it is similar? The one we make is a recipe from one of my husband's co-workers.

    Sure! Take 2 pounds of beef (we use chuck) Cut into 3/4 inch cubes Put beef in pot, add 1 heaping Tbsp. ginger/garlic paste Add to the pot the following ground spice mixture: In a spice grinder-18 black peppercorns, 6 cloves, 6 green cardamom pods, 2 black cardamom pods, 1 stick cinnamon, 1 bay leaf, 1 1/2 Tbsp.fennel seeds Add ground spice mixture to pot We use a pressure cooker to cook the beef, about 20 minutes or you can cook it with water on the stove for 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours. Boil off most of the remaining water, leave a tiny bit of it. In a big frypan heat coconut oil Add mustard seeds, wait half a minute, add 7 to 8 curry leaves, then add 1 large thinly sliced onion. Fry onion until just starting to turn golden, then add beef from pot. Add 1/2 tsp. dry black pepper and salt. Fry for about 4 or 5 minutes. You can add shredded coconut to the mix at the same time as the salt and pepper if you want. My husband LOVES the taste of fennel so I usually add another 1/2 tsp. of fennel powder as well, but not everyone is a fennel freak. That's it! I usually serve this with Rasam over rice. Rasam is a thin, tomato, tamarind, peppery type broth. Let me know if you'd like the recipe. Beef fry freezes really well, so I can get several meals out it.
  • Baking is a stress reliever for me. So we usually have at least one, usually two baked goods sitting around the house.  My most requested recipes are white chocolate lemon blondies (from http://www.averiecooks.com/2014/06/lemon-lemonies.html) and the classic TollHouse Chocolate Chip cookies. The lemon blondies are wonderful to relieve the dreariness of wintertime.

    And for some reason, people seem to prefer the cookies when I've made a mistake. I have a tendency to soften the butter too much, so the cookies spread in the oven. The edges are crisp and the centers are chewy. My husband insists they are better that way! He took some to the recording studio where he works and the band/crew members devoured them by 9:30 in the morning. 
  • @Gemfemme that sounds amazing! 

    I'd love the rasam recipe - husband bought me an idli steamer this week and rasam sounds like just the thing to mix it up from sambol while I am perfecting idli.
  • Tomato Rasam-
    In a blender, grind 2 or 3 fresh tomatoes or 1 can diced tomatoes.
    Heat oil in a saucepan. Add mustard seeds and 6 curry leaves.
    Add the following spice mixture- 1 tsp. ground coriander, 1 tsp. ground cumin, 1 tsp. red chili powder (can add more or less), 1/2 tsp. paprika, 1/2 tsp. turmeric powder, 1/2 tsp. ground black pepper.
    Fry the spice mixture about a minute.
    Add the blended tomatoes.
    Add the soaked tamarand. I use tamarand paste from the Indian grocery. I fill a coffee cup half with water, put it in the microwave for about 45 seconds, then scoop out a rounded tbsp. of the tamarand paste and put that in the hot water in the cup and stir it until the paste softens.
    Once you add the tamarand add about a cup and a half of water to the pan, add salt to taste and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.
    Scoop over basmati rice and eat with the beef fry.
    We have an Indian priest in our parish whose become more like a favorite uncle to us who always requests that I make the beef fry and rasam for him among other things. He'll call up every couple of weeks, "Suzy, I'm free for dinner on Friday!". Lol.
  • Gemfemme said:
    Something I've never been able to do right in 17 years is Biryani, a rich and yummy meat and rice dish. So many freaking steps! So many opportunities to screw it up! Bah!
    I've made a biryani recipe, but have no idea how authentic it is because I am Vietnamese and my husband is Mexican and neither of us have ever ordered it in a restaurant.  One of these days!  I do remember it having a ridiculous amount of steps, though.
  • I'd love the rasam recipe - husband bought me an idli steamer this week and rasam sounds like just the thing to mix it up from sambol while I am perfecting idli.
    I'm pretty sure I know some of those words, LOL.
  • Gemfemme said:
    Something I've never been able to do right in 17 years is Biryani, a rich and yummy meat and rice dish. So many freaking steps! So many opportunities to screw it up! Bah!
    I've made a biryani recipe, but have no idea how authentic it is because I am Vietnamese and my husband is Mexican and neither of us have ever ordered it in a restaurant.  One of these days!  I do remember it having a ridiculous amount of steps, though.

    Yeah! Kim, can you give me a recipe for bun rieu? Our favorite Vietnamese restaurant makes it with ground up shrimp and I LOVE it!
  • @Gemfemme I'm afraid I'm a total fraud as a Vietnamese woman!  I've only made pho, cha gio, and banh xeo.  Any recipes for bun rieu I could give you would just be from my good friend Google.
  • Olive tapenade. Its Alice Waters' recipe. People call it "olive soup", because its seriously olive oil-y and drippy. (Its different kinds of olives, garlic, capers, black pepper and a vat of olive oil.) You need a good French or other solid bread to soak it up.

    Also, chocolate death cookies that have red pepper in them.
  • I love to bake--cookies, cakes, cupcakes, brownies, bars. I'm mostly known for my GF cookies (none of which are my recipes, all of which are super delicious and not difficult)--chocolate peanut butter cookies, oatmeal-raisin cookies, deep dark chocolate cookies. Probably my most popular cookies are my toffee-chocolate chunk cookies.

    (Just don't ask me to bake anything that has yeast in it. My superpower is killing yeast and making dense, disgusting loaves of bread. It's a harsh fate for me, because I love the smell of fresh-baked bread.)
  • Kim, it's all good. Sometimes I feel like google is my best friend too!
  • @Gemfemme thanks! That rasam sounds delicious! I use the seedless tamarind pulp - it's a bit of work to break it down, but the flavour is so good!

    I have a lovely biryani recipe which I will write out for you. It's a fiddle to make but worthwhile!
  • My Parkerhouse rolls using the recipe from Beard on Bread.  I am also the dessert person when the family gets together because I love to bake.  I haven't made biscuits in the longest time and I need to make biscuits for my grandkids so they can eventually learn to make biscuits.   I don't want to get rusty.
  • Black bean Yamchiladas with ale-mole sauce. Honestly, this dish picked me more than I picked it. Mostly because of the boyfriend. It's his absolute favorite, so he always volunteers me to make it for events, or when we have out of town company we're trying to impress. I've had quite a few people cock a brow at the flavor combo (ahem, Mom), but it's always been a hit! 
  • My MIL's recipe for New Mexican green chile chicken enchiladas is always requested to be brought to work. My boss is obsessed. I finally gave her the recipe and a carton of frozen green chile form NM for Christmas so she'd stop asking me to make them all the time. 

    For dessert, my great-great-grandma's recipe for pecan pie. It's the only pecan pie worth eating in my opinion and it's been adopted by my MIL who will now only eat it. I'm the pecan pie maker come Thanksgiving. 
  • I know Deviled Eggs are, like, the easiest thing in the world but my wasabi deviled eggs are what is requested whenever we do a family gathering. Trader Joe's wasabi mayo, dijon mustard, a little bit of dried parsley and I top it off with fresh ground pepper rather than paprika. I have to make more every time.

    My sister and I came up with one of those great ideas you come up with when you've had a few beers at the bar... but THIS idea we came up with one year really was brilliant. Our Other Brother, who is a brewer and owns a local pub, makes an amazing Scottish Heavy which we both love and I said, 'they make beer can chicken, right? We need to figure out how to do that with this!' Given that Dunbar doesn't bottle his stuff (yet! That's hopefully changing this summer!) we weren't sure how to go about it but my sister said she had a turkey (it was September and that really confused me... 'why do you have a turkey in your freezer in September?') and so we did some research and came up with a hybrid recipe that has resulted in her taking over Thanksgiving for Mom once and for all. Scottish Heavy Turkey with World Peace Gravy. (Seriously, the gravy would cause World Peace. It's that good.) It's herby and savory and rich and every year she has to make more gravy and every year we're out almost immediately.

    Recently, I discovered a salmon recipe that even my mother, who doesn't like salmon at all, thought was delicious. Super easy and super fast... salmon filets, a maple syrup/pub mustard glaze, bake for 6-8 minutes. It's goooood.
  • @Gemfemme, which cookbooks did you study?  I love Indian food, and would love to be able to make my own since my taste buds and stomach can't handle the spiciness I sometimes get at restaurants.  

    @Stellavision, Bacon Explosion?  It sounds dangerous and intriguing.  Is there a recipe or technique?  

    My family loves my Key Lime Pie and Pumpkin Cake Bars with Cream Cheese Frosting.  I tried Taco Soup for me once, but I had never used Rotel before, so I didn't know even the mild can would be too spicy for me.  I ended up taking in to work, and my student workers ate it up.  They now request it frequently.  
  • My favorite fancy-pants thing to make is herb crusted rack of lamb. I know, I know - the recipe is for herb-crusted pork loin, but I prefer the other, so that's what I make. What can I say? I like a nice rack.

    I also made some Key Lime Coconut cupcakes with white chocolate frosting for a bake sale last weekend. Soooo. Goooood. Though I didn't do it this time, I have made a regular cake version before and added a layer of lime or coconut curd in between the layers too, which doesn't suck.
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