If you loved Jane Eyre...

You will also love Lyndsay Faye's "retelling" called Jane Steele. I don't want to give anything away, but Reader, she gets her revenge!

Comments

  • I am so glad to finally hear from someone who has read it. I have been wondering if I should get it. Thanks!
  • I DID love Jane Eyre. Anyone read the "Reader, I Married Him" short story collection? I'm definitely interested.
  • OMG, I'm SOOO interested in both of these!
  • My mom (and sister) love "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde.  I thought it was alright; just not my style, and the one character I DID like got shoved to the side early on.  But they're gaga for it, and I disliked Jane Eyre to begin with (they both like it), so perhaps y'alls will like it?
  • I thought The Eyre Affair was ok. But too in love with its own gimmick. I tried to read the first sequel and just couldn't.

    Jane Eyre was my first adult "classic" (read it for the first time when I was around 13) and I just loved it. There was another retelling of it a few years ago called The Flight of Gemma Hardy that I remember liking a lot.
  • I liked the Eyre Affair a lot, mainly because I like the idea of a world where literature is so celebrates.

    Another JE retelling is Re Jane, which tells the story from the perspective of a Korean American woman who becomes a nanny to Park Slope yuppies. I read it a book club, and wasn't that excited about it.
  • You will also love Lyndsay Faye's "retelling" called Jane Steele. I don't want to give anything away, but Reader, she gets her revenge!

    Revenge on who though? By the end of the book Mrs. Reed and John are dead, Georgina is married, Alice (?) is a nun, and St. John is dying. Now I have to go get the book!
  • edited May 2016
    My mom (and sister) love "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde.  I thought it was alright; just not my style, and the one character I DID like got shoved to the side early on.  But they're gaga for it, and I disliked Jane Eyre to begin with (they both like it), so perhaps y'alls will like it?
    Yeah - I was not a fan. Jasper Fforde seemed to be a long way up his own arse. Which @KarenFK put much more pleasantly.
  • Curse you, @TheLibrarian!! I just spent almost $100 on B&N.com - it's amazing how many books you "need" once you get over there and start browsing. They're so helpful with their recommendations too!

    Hi, I'm OffToSeeHim and I'm a bookaholic...
  • edited May 2016
    I don't think anyone has mentioned the lyrical novel Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys (1966)?

    Rhys gives us a sort of feminist prequel to Jane Eyre:  the story of Bertha, the wife/madwoman in the attic!   When we learn Bertha's history we have great compassion for her, of course.  The narration comes from three different voices:  Antoinette herself (a white Jamaican heiress, renamed Bertha by Rochester), Grace Poole, and Rochester.

    I think this was the novel that inspired so many modern "yeah, well, here's the villain's side" stories (Wicked, etc.)!
  • I've read  "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde and my opinion is somewhere between @KarenFK's ("too in love with its own gimmick") and @Scout's ("I like the idea of a world where literature is so celebrated"). I'm not interested enough to read the sequel of that, but the other spinoffs/retellings everyone has suggested here are going on my reading list.
  • I don't think anyone has mentioned the lyrical novel Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys (1966)?

    Rhys gives us a sort of feminist prequel to Jane Eyre:  the story of Bertha, the wife/madwoman in the attic!   When we learn Bertha's history we have great compassion for her, of course.  The narration comes from three different voices:  Antoinette herself (a white Jamaican heiress, renamed Bertha by Rochester), Grace Poole, and Rochester.

    I think this was the novel that inspired so many modern "yeah, well, here's the villain's side" stories (Wicked, etc.)!

    Stop, STOP!! I just ordered six books from B&N!! I can't order any more!!
  • Curse you, @TheLibrarian!! I just spent almost $100 on B&N.com - it's amazing how many books you "need" once you get over there and start browsing. They're so helpful with their recommendations too!

    Hi, I'm OffToSeeHim and I'm a bookaholic...
    As a professional, I can tell you that being a bookaholic is a good thing! But I would look into borrowing from your public library - it's free. I rarely buy books (except at work), and I read a lot. As soon as I read a review for a book that sounds interesting, I request it online from the local public library system. It's very rare that they don't have what I'm looking for, and, unless it's something super popular, I usually get it within a couple of weeks at the most.
  • Curse you, @TheLibrarian!! I just spent almost $100 on B&N.com - it's amazing how many books you "need" once you get over there and start browsing. They're so helpful with their recommendations too!

    Hi, I'm OffToSeeHim and I'm a bookaholic...
    As a professional, I can tell you that being a bookaholic is a good thing! But I would look into borrowing from your public library - it's free. I rarely buy books (except at work), and I read a lot. As soon as I read a review for a book that sounds interesting, I request it online from the local public library system. It's very rare that they don't have what I'm looking for, and, unless it's something super popular, I usually get it within a couple of weeks at the most.
    As a non-professional, I completely agree! I don't think I could ever live anywhere that didn't have nearby access to a good public library.
  • I don't think anyone has mentioned the lyrical novel Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys (1966)?

    Rhys gives us a sort of feminist prequel to Jane Eyre:  the story of Bertha, the wife/madwoman in the attic!   When we learn Bertha's history we have great compassion for her, of course.  The narration comes from three different voices:  Antoinette herself (a white Jamaican heiress, renamed Bertha by Rochester), Grace Poole, and Rochester.

    I think this was the novel that inspired so many modern "yeah, well, here's the villain's side" stories (Wicked, etc.)!
    It's been ages since I read "Wide Sargasso Sea", but recommend it highly. Yes, it is an early entry in the 'other side' genre.
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