Books you find completely devastating.

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Comments

  • I'm so glad your teacher was sympathetic, @thecripplecricket.  Halfway through your post I was getting nervous it would end terribly!
  • @firebirdsinger I'm getting very excited to re read these - which is odd, because I'm really excited to remember which parts broke my heart.  Other than Reepicheep, of course 
  • I ADORE Reepicheep. And Puddleglum.
    Oh Puddleglum!  I identified with him SO HARD during my awkward middle school years!
  • Tortie said:
    Without a doubt the most devastating book I have ever read is "Vanished" by Mary McGarry Morris, read it about 20 years ago and I still think of it now and then.

    Also the haunting novella "The Long Walk" by Stephen King (as Richard Bachman)-think of it every time I drive on I-95. 
    I just ordered both of those on Amazon! Thanks!!
  • @tortie!!!!!!! I read The Long Walk first (in a day!). Uuuggghhhhh.
    I'm reading Vanished right now & it is so upsetting :(
  • @DrSparkles



     

    Have you finished up "Vanished" yet? How did you like it?

  • edited March 2016
    Yes! I really liked it, it was so sad. I was NOT happy w one person's ending
    Thank you for the recommendations!
  • Just last week I finished reading "A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson on an airplane.  It was the best book I've read in a while, but I was grateful that no one seemed to notice that I had tears streaming down my face for much of the flight.


  • Just last week I finished reading "A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson on an airplane.  It was the best book I've read in a while, but I was grateful that no one seemed to notice that I had tears streaming down my face for much of the flight.


    I re read Elanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell while I was on jury duty a few weeks back and I started tearing up at the end, to the point that the guy a few seats over asked me if I was ok!
  • Just last week I finished reading "A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson on an airplane.  It was the best book I've read in a while, but I was grateful that no one seemed to notice that I had tears streaming down my face for much of the flight.


    I could not have read that in public!

    The fact that my English, countryside-loving grandfather is called Ted and has dementia also means I can't recommend it to my mum, although she loved Life After Life.
  • I am currently mid-way through the audio-book for A Little Life, by Hanya Yanagihara, and it is HARROWING. Amazing, but heartbreaking, gut-wrenching, horrible and beautiful all at once. The easy description is that it follows the lives of four friends from their 20s through their 50s, in New York, and the trauma that befell one in particular as a child. Those terrible parts are doled out throughout the book in the midst of flash-forwards and flashbacks, and honestly there are times when I just have to turn off the book because they are soul-crushing. But I always want to turn it back on, because the character development is such that you want to know what happens to each one. The book is long - I think hard back is something like 750 pages, because the audio book is 26 CDs!! Still, if you read it and loved it, let me know, because this is one book that will stick with me forever.
  • When Breathe Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi - the true story of a young doctor who is diagnosed with terminal cancer and goes from treating patients to becoming a patient.   It did not help that I read this on the flight back home after my father died.  It is a beautiful story though in the sense that it reminds you what is important, and that you don't get any guarantees.
  • Hi, I'm new.   I  was devastated by   The Bell Jar  Because, as a kid I didn't know her fate.   Then 1984.  The worst was Sophie''s Choice,   I could NOT read  Go Set a Watchman because I couldn't face the destruction of Atticus.  There are so many!  I agree with Kite Runner and Night.  Goodbye Elie Weisel.   
  • Aslan said:
    Hi, I'm new.   I  was devastated by   The Bell Jar  Because, as a kid I didn't know her fate.   Then 1984.  The worst was Sophie''s Choice,   I could NOT read  Go Set a Watchman because I couldn't face the destruction of Atticus.  There are so many!  I agree with Kite Runner and Night.  Goodbye Elie Weisel.   

    A Thousand Splendid Suns, by the author of The Kite Runner, was just devastating to me. I already had children at the time. The first time I read Sophie's Choice I didn't get it - the second time, DD was 6 and DS was 4 and I sobbed my heart out.
  • Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster. Real life accounts of the incident. I cried pretty much the hole time reading it. One thing that I found really horrifying is that the government mixed contaminated meat with good meat selling it at a higher price thinking no one would buy it. Another is about the men sent in to "clean up" by evacuating people, killing domestic animals (one story is really hard to read), and contamination clean up all with little protection.

    The author Svetlana Alexievich won a Nobel Lit. prize in 2015.
  • Hope you have tissues at the ready and enjoy it, @firebirdsinger! And thanks I will definitely check it out.
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